Archives

February, 2014

Read Your Bible with Fr. Adam OSB

This talk is from the Simple House winter retreat 2014. Fr. Adam Ryan is a monk at Conception Abbey, and he is the long time retreat master for Simple House volunteers. Please forgive the audio (we will get better)!
These talks are very popular with former volunteers, and we will be posting as many Fr. Adam talks as possible.

Stunning Article on Priests in Ukraine

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/02/20/dramatic-photos-ukraines-priests-take-an-active-role-in-protests/

There are some great pictures in the article.  This isn’t a normal post for the ASH blog, but the article deserves recognition.

Human Development

A key word in Catholic Social teaching is “human development.”  Everyone is owed the chance to develop, to be more.  Social thought can get stuck thinking in terms of money, property, and education, but we really owe people a chance to pursue their happiness.  This chance to develop involves resources, but it is not defined by resource amounts.

NPR has done a very good job with an educational video about t-shirt production.  The video isn’t full of guilt or blame.  The video is an entertaining journey through the garment industry, and it does a good job of discussing human development opportunities in Bangladesh and Columbia.  I am not a big fan of NPR, but this video is good food for thought.

Pope Benedict XVI brought human development to the forefront of Catholic Social thought with his encyclical, Charity in Truth.

The Christian lowers himself

“We should not put ourselves above others, but indeed lower ourselves, place ourselves a the service of others, become small with the small and poor with the poor. It is regrettable to see a Christian who does not want to lower himself, who does not want to serve. A Christian who struts about is ugly: this is not Christian, it is pagan. The Christian serves, he lowers himself.

-Pope Francis. December 18, 2013.
General Audience, St.Peter’s Square.

Going For Broke

Our Christian sacrifice has a purpose, and it is always for the sake of love. Every Christian sacrifice is an opportunity to go for broke on the greatest love of your life and your ultimate happiness. It is a bold choice against selfishness, for the good of another, and in favor of a rich relationship with God. Fundamentally, sacrifice is an act of trust. It requires trust that God is the author of our happiness, not us. This trust is the basis of a relationship with God and the doorway to true freedom and lasting happiness. This trust is faith.

Summer 2010